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Can You Trust the Cloud?

Cloud Trust Cloud Security Cloud Encryption  trust cloud hand Can You Trust the Cloud?I am often asked by skeptics, cynics, doubters, and readers of sensational journalism if they can trust the cloud.  Sure, there have been data leaks, hacker intrusions, NSA spies, but can the cloud be trusted with your data?

YES

End of article.

Not really . . . yes, the cloud can definitely be trusted, but that doesn’t allow you to be foolish.  Metaphorically, you can trust your Volvo too – but you should still fasten your seat belt.  You are still responsible to protect yourself, and in the cloud computing scenario, that means that you are ultimately responsible to protect your data.  My advice is this:

Trust the cloud.  And take security measures to protect your data.

The level of security (in the form of cloud encryption) needed will depend on what you are planning to use the cloud for.

Individuals who want to securely store files on websites such as Dropbox or Google Docs need a minimal amount of security so that their information isn’t widely available. In recent years, the developers of these services added the necessary encryption to keep the average hacker out1.  

For those who want to power applications, databases or tools on a group of computers through the cloud, extra protection is needed since there are more entry points to protect. Companies that want to secure data in the cloud should work with a qualified cloud provider or cloud security vendor who will provide data encryption options to protect against internal and external threats as well as meet industry data privacy rules (PCI, HIPPA, etc.).

If you work with sensitive information that is protected by law or industry regulations, you require the highest level of protection. For example, companies in the healthcare industry must take care to encrypt private patient data in order to comply with HIPAA regulations2. Companies that accept credit card payments must comply with PCI regulations3.  For these companies, it is important to understand what the potential risks are and how to secure the data and adhere to the regulations.

So, which security measures should you take?

The CSA (Cloud Security Alliance) has identified a number of challenges to cloud computing security4:

  1. Data breaches – If a cloud service database isn’t designed properly, a hacker could get into customers’ data.
    Solution: Choose a cloud provider that allows maximum control over encryption keys.
  2. Data loss – A careless provider could lose data due to a hacker or natural disaster. This can be problematic for compliance with regulations as well as customer relations.
    Solution: Use encrypted backup where you control the encryption keys.
  3. Account or service traffic hijacking – If credentials are stolen, a hacker could carry out actions in the name of the company.
    Solution: Use two-factor authentication techniques wherever possible.
  4. Insecure interfaces and APIs – Third parties building on to existing APIs can weaken their security, especially if they require relinquishing of credentials. Solution: Understand the implications and risks of adding layers to APIs.
  5. Malicious insiders – If credentials are available to multiple employees within an organization, the company is susceptible to malicious insider attack. Solution: Keys should be available only at data-usage time.
  6. Cloud abuse – A hacker might use the cloud service in order to break a code he couldn’t get into on a standard computer. He might use it to propagate malware or share pirated software.
    Solution: Cloud providers must define abuse and determine how to identify it.
  7. Insufficient due diligence – Companies who don’t sufficiently understand the security issues inherent in cloud computing may unwittingly harm their own security.
    Solution: Allocation of resources for education and due diligence before getting started.
  8. Shared technology vulnerabilities – Cloud providers share platforms in order to save on costs, but this means that when one component is harmed, the others are vulnerable as well.
    Solution: a defensive, in-depth strategy, as well as monitoring.

 

That’s a lot of security measures!

It may seem safer just to stay out of the cloud, but for most businesses, this is likely to be impractical.  The cloud can handle a large amount of data at lower cost and increased flexibility.  Also, I would be remiss not to note that information stored on desktops is not necessarily secure either; hackers have been known to infiltrate data stored on physical computers and mobile devices as well.

 

Is there an easy way to protect myself?

Strong cloud encryption makes the cloud a safe environment for storing data (even for the most sensitive, regulated, protected data). Make sure to choose the level of encryption necessary for your data. If your company complies with HIPAA or PCI or handles customers’ private information, pick a cloud provider which uses split-key encryption (aka Homomorphic Key Encryption). This is a system which requires two keys to access data.  One key remains under your control as the owner of the data. When this master key is in use in the cloud, it is encrypted, thus ensuring that the cloud provider doesn’t have access to your data and neither does anyone who attempts to hack in. This will ensure safety in the cloud.

This is why I say that you can completely trust the cloud.  If you take the proper steps to protect yourself (a split-key seat belt, if you will), the cloud is not a menacing, dangerous place to store data.  It is, in fact: scalable, flexible, cost-effective, and a great solution, which can (and should!) be safe and secure.

The post Can You Trust the Cloud? appeared first on Porticor Cloud Security.

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More Stories By Gilad Parann-Nissany

Gilad Parann-Nissany, Founder and CEO at Porticor is a pioneer of Cloud Computing. He has built SaaS Clouds for medium and small enterprises at SAP (CTO Small Business); contributing to several SAP products and reaching more than 8 million users. Recently he has created a consumer Cloud at G.ho.st - a cloud operating system that delighted hundreds of thousands of users while providing browser-based and mobile access to data, people and a variety of cloud-based applications. He is now CEO of Porticor, a leader in Virtual Privacy and Cloud Security.