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Musings on Neural Networking By @DaveGraham | @CloudExpo #Cloud

I’ve always had a fascination with the way information is acquired and process

Given my last post was in November of 2013 (trust me, I’ve been busy), I figured I’d start out with a heady topic like “Neural

Networking” in an age where Deep Machine Learning and perhaps its lesser cousin, assisted Machine Learning (I’ll define in a bit), seem to be all the rage.  However, before we begin, I want to make a few things clear:

  • I’m no expert in these fields.
  • I’m musing out loud here.  You’re my audience and what you determine to be salient and what you deem junk is, well, your problem, not mine.
  • DML/AML, Neural Networking, and a whole host of other terms, acronyms, mindf**k level events, etc. are here. Deal with it.

So with such an illustrious preface, I suppose we should let the party begin.

I’ve always had a fascination with the way information is acquired and process. Reading back through the history of this site, you can see this tendency towards more fanciful thinking, e.g., GPGPU assisted network analytics, future storage systems using Torrenza-style processing.  What has once been theory has made its way into the realm of praxis; looking no further than ICML 2015, for example, to see the forays into DML that nVidia is making with their GPUs.  And on the story goes.  Having said all this, there are elements of data, of data networking, of data processing, which, to date, have NOT gleaned all the benefits of this type of acceleration.  To that end, what I am going to attempt to posit today is an area where Neural Networking (or at least the benefits therein) can be usefully applied to an area interacted with every single nanosecond of every day: the network.

Glossary:
Before we get much further, we should probably have a definition of some terms that I will be using:

  • Deep Machine Learning (DML): burgeoning area of machine learning research focused on machine intelligence utilizing underlying principles of neural networking
  • Assisted Machine Learning (aka Hybrid; AML): a half-step towards DML where pre-pended processing is done by fixed systems within a rough grid approach  and learning takes place on these processed chunks of data.
  • Neural Networking: “a computing system made up of a number of simple, highly interconnected processing elements, which process information by their dynamic state response to external inputs.” (In “Neural Network Primer: Part I” by Maureen Caudill, AI Expert, Feb. 1989)
  • Packet Forwarding Engines (PFE): base level of hardware in a contemporary network switch

State of the Union: Networks
To talk about the future, some mention is needed of the current état de fait of systems networking.

Packet Forward Engines (PFEs) are the muscle of networking switches. Today, we’re facing routinely more powerful PFEs, both custom as well as mainline/merchant.  Companies like Cisco, Broadcom, Xpliant, Intel, Marvel, Juniper, etc. have propagated designs and delivered ever-increasingly scalable devices that can process billions of bits of information at a time.  The traceable curve here closely follows an analog of Moore’s law while not exactly staying within the same bounds (e.g. I could point out that Broadcom’s Trident/Trident+ compared to the currently shipping Trident 2 are not all that far removed from each other both in frequency, scale, latency, and processing power).  If we allow for interstitial comparisons cross-vendor, the story changes somewhat and, to my mind, the curve becomes even more pronounced.  Comparing custom silicon from Juniper or Cisco to that of Broadcom, for example, shows a higher level of capability present in these more custom designs, albeit with a slower time to market.  All this is being said by way of pointing out that compared to host-level development of processors (like Intel’s Xeon/Core and AMD‘s APU/CPU line ups), these specialized processing units have a different scale in/scale out process.  Consequently, their application has been mostly stagnant; a switch line or two released with a regular cadence of roughly 18 months or so, interspersed by the next important part of networking: the software.

Software development is as critical to the current state of networking as the hardware is.  Relying on fixed pipeline devices (as the Trident 2 is), requires a certain level of determinism to be designed into the software that controls it.  With the seminal development of software development kits (SDKs), the de-coupling has allowed for vendors to write against a known set of functions with a healthy separation from the underlying hardware.  This abstraction has both accomplished a level of increasing functionality and capability within the systems (e.g. Broadcom’s concept of a programmable unified forwarding table (UFT)),  as well as allowing for agile development of the overlaying software (e.g. quicker time to market for a network operating system (NOS) built on top of said SDK).  Having this level of functionality is important as it allows more agile decisions to be made as standards or protocols are ratified for implementation.    An NOS is only as capable as the hardware it lies upon, however, and that leads us to the third part of the current network: the control plane processing.

The control plane of a network switch is the brain of the operations. A PFE is useless as a commodity processor.  If you examine its structure closely, its functional blocks are designed for very purpose driven applications.  This type of processing, while important for the datagrams it will functionally serve, is useless for running more banal applications like an NOS.  However, generic processing hardware, like PowerPC, MIPS, ARM, or even x86 cores can be harnessed to manage this type of workload very effectively.  In recent years, there has been increasing momentum to moving these control plane processing entities from more archaic and proprietary architectures like PPC and MIPS, to more modern and commercially available standards like ARM and x86.  This move has allowed for modernizing the control plane from an embedded system to a discrete “system on a switch” running modern operating systems and either virtualizing the NOS (e.g. like Juniper’s QFX5100 switch line) or partitioning via containers or some other level of abstraction.  The benefits of such systems cannot be ignored as again, time to market and feature development becomes more agile in nature.  (Side note: the role of ARM as a valid control plane foundation cannot be overlooked and will be the subject of another post at some point in the not-so-distant future).

In summary, the current networking switch present in the data center is comprised of a PFE, a network operating system (NOS), and a control plane to run the NOS. This is not unlike a commodity server with lots of physical interfaces designed for ingress and egress of data.  These switches are increasingly complex and performance-heavy and provide a robust foundation upon which to build neural networks.

Becoming Neural, not Neurotic
When you walk into your living room, tell your Xbox One to turn itself on (“Xbox On!”) and watch as the always-listening machine powers up your TV and itself and then scans you really quick to determine identity, you’re watching machine learning in action. This process makes use of both audio and visual queuing and localization of data (a core component of neural networking) to derive identity and causality.  You had to walk through a setup process to both capture your image as well as your vocalization.  This was stored in a local database and used as a reference point.  The system is given rough control points to operate against but is functionally able to interact against this baseline; case in point, depending on my level of beard growth or not, my Xbox has various levels of success in determining who I am by sight.  The same goes for my iPhone, my Android, my Amazon Echo, etc.  Each of these machines has a minimal database connected to a backend process (the “cloud” or another hosted platform) and performs a fixed function (voice recognition, facial recognition).  All this explanation is to demonstrate that we’re in the throes of neural networks without even realizing.  If we look at the network as a necessary part of this process, it becomes the springboard for incredible capability.

So how can a transport layer become “neural”?  Looking back at our definition of “neural networks” we see that at its very foundation is the concept connectedness.  A network is a collection of interconnected devices using some sort of medium, whether copper, optical, or radio frequency that allows them to interoperate or exchange data.  Transporting data, whether electrical, radio frequency, or optical, is just that: transport.  It implies neither intelligence nor insight.  The sender and the receiver, however, can operate on data and make decisions with some level of determinism, though, and this is where we will focus.  Historically, one would look for the systems attached to the transport layer as the true members of the network.  However, as noted previously, with the advent of “system on a switch” control planes, suddenly we have the appearance of systems as joining points, not just transport pipes.

Moving further, if these transport junctions or pipes suddenly develop the intelligence, based on no other inputs but data, to route “conversations” or data in ways that logically make sense and have derived value to either the sender, receiver, or both, have we achieved a neural network? We can see some basic interworkings of this in the use of LLDP (link layer discovery protocol) as a low level exchange of “who are you?” information, but this is derived from extant specifications of what a datagram should look like.  This isn’t flaunting the concepts of neural networking but belies that data, exclusive of content and context, is known already.  So, the next logical leap is how that data is interpreted.

Let’s presuppose that LLDP has provided two neighboring switches with the identity, capability, and proximity to each other.  What then?  As hosts are connected one side to another, data will flow based on the hosts requirements for connectedness and data.  The transport layer, at that point, is nothing more than transport; simple forwarding devices.  However, let’s also assume that these two switches have a system attached to each respective control plane that is constantly watching traffic as it flows across and is “learning.”  What these switches are learning can be perceived as raw input and can be manipulated and quantified as such.  In a neural networking world, these systems are nascent; raw with no heuristic capability as yet designed.

The situation described above is precisely why networking systems function so completely today.  They’re not tasked with anything beyond fixed parameters or inspection.  Think of it:  IETF and IEEE have specified what a datagram should look like.  It should have Layer-2 source and destination media access control (mac) address along with payload, for example.  But beyond this, what is accomplished?  The PFE is looking for datagrams that conform to these standards to pass along; anything else is malformed and dropped.  You quickly reach a situation where, heuristically, you’re limiting the overall potential of these machines to be simple engines, receiving parameters and doing as told.  What, then, could be done?

Vision Casting
I can sit here and postulate any number of ideas that my peers have already done.  I’m more interested in what we can do with the data that is already present.  We can argue that daemons that run in the kernel, statistic packages that collect PFE-published data points, or other such utilities are useful.  In a way, they are, but they represent a subset of capabilities and are mostly human driven (AML at its finest).  What if, however, each time a request is made, the switch learns what data points are being requested and viewed and is able to selectively feed only the most salient points back to its consumers without flooding tons of useless information?  What if this is a priori to a receiver (in the classic SNMP use case)? What if this is machine driven (DML) and becomes part of the flow?

For a network to become “aware” and fully realized as neural in nature (and presupposing the eventual coupling of machine state to machine state thru a hyperaware network as my conclusion) it must be able to functionally process data on its own, either by simple heuristic learning (profiling, as noted above, is just one method) or through the contrived mechanisms of its NOS in a non-rigid manner (e.g. not L2 learning, etc.)  Certainly the use of standardized protocols for initial communication is encouraged, since it can engage heterogenous systems together in communication without other proprietary lower-level protocols like HiGig, but beyond this initial negotiation, the hope and desire is that learning, forwarding, reporting, and engaging become autonomous and self-forming.  As systems interact, then, decisions will be made based on what the datagram contains, the way the PFE is responding to traffic flows and utilization, and also what the next connected device is doing.  This capability is present, to some extent, today in systems that use a network management system (NMS) that wholistically can see the network for what it is, but this external intelligence, is again, driven from the outside in and not organic to the devices themselves.

Conclusion
I’ve laid out what I hope is the framework for an ongoing discussion of neural networks (without delving into AML/DML this go around) and their role within the actual network space.  I’m curious as to your thoughts (constructive, please).

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Dave Graham

Dave Graham is a Technical Consultant with EMC Corporation where he focused on designing/architecting private cloud solutions for commercial customers.

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